The Bruin Voice

New Years Resolutions and those that are actually taken seriously

Amara Del Prato, Entertainment Editor

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It’s only been a few weeks since 2019 began, but most students’ New Year’s resolutions are already fading into nonexistence. According to U.S. News, 80 percent of New Year’s resolutions become unfulfilled by the second week of February.
It’s the same story every year: students vow to stay on a diet, to save money, to get good grades, etcetera, but halfway into January, the pressure of abiding by their resolutions becomes unbearable and eventually they decide to give up completely. To be fair, there are some determined people who actually make resolutions and manage to stick to them, but the reality is that this group is very small.
“I don’t think a lot of people follow through with their resolutions,” sophomore Emma Mangrum said. “I don’t have any resolutions.”
However, not all hope is lost. It’s still not too late for students to make a significant change in their lives this year; the key is starting off small and keeping a positive mindset.
Instead of setting one large, looming goal for the year, which can end up feeling too overwhelming to achieve, accomplishing a series of small, daily or weekly goals can effectively help achieve a larger goal. For example, setting aside a few dollars a week is a good way to contribute to the overall goal of saving enough money to buy a new computer.
Tasks should start off fairly simple, then gradually become more and more difficult as the year progresses. Beginning the year with vigorous exercise after binging for the entire month of December can be extremely draining and discouraging; it’s mentally and physically healthier to do a few exercises every day and then slowly build up to the more challenging drills.
Another tactic that is guaranteed to help keep New Year’s resolutions is to talk about resolutions with family and friends; support systems provide positive encouragement and accountability.
“Having someone to share your struggles and successes with makes your journey to a healthier lifestyle that much easier and less intimidating,” an article by the American Psychological Association said.
Finally, staying positive throughout the struggles of reaching a goal is vital to the process of accomplishing it. Giving up on pursuing a goal because of one minor slip-up is irrational. However, staying determined and positive throughout the year can transform goals into reality. whoi

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About the Writer
Amara Del Prato, Co-Opinion Editor, Staff Writer

Amara (Anara) Del Prato plays golf during her free time and saves from Journalism plights. She attended the November 2018 Journalism Convention in Chicago...

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New Years Resolutions and those that are actually taken seriously